Friday, February 25, 2011

Tom Wood's New Book: Rollback

Tom Woods, the same New York Times best selling author that gave us "Meltdown" which explained the current financial crisis, the "Politically Incorrect Guide to American History" , "Who Killed the Constitution" and others has a new book out. He talks a little bit about the book in this video clip and criticizes the government is our savior and all that is holy mythology we are all taught in the 6th grade.

What the book is about in Tom's own words:

The book does two things. First, it lays bare the true fiscal position of the U.S. government, and shows why some kind of default is not merely possible but inevitable. But this is not a book full of numbers about the impending collapse. The collapse is merely the jumping-off point. By far the more central part of the book is this: the critical first step for reversing this mess and checking the seemingly unstoppable federal advance is to stick a dagger through the heart of the myths by which government has secured the confidence and consent of the people.

We know these myths by heart. Government acts on behalf of the public good. It keeps us safe. It protects us against monopolies. It provides indispensable services we could not provide for ourselves. Without it, America would be populated by illiterates, half of us would be dead from quack medicine or exploding consumer products, and the other half would lead a feudal existence under the iron fist of private firms that worked them to the bone for a dollar a week.

and some of the topics covered:

  • Could we survive without the welfare state?
  • Was the Industrial Revolution a disaster for workers, and evidence of the wickedness of the free market?
  • The market vs. global poverty
  • How the market, in spite (not because) of government, leads to higher living standards for everyone
  • How the market leads to improved working conditions and does away with child labor
  • Federal education programs: a critique
  • Doesn’t Sweden prove a large welfare state is compatible with lasting prosperity?
  • If government shrinks, won’t big business fill the void and oppress the public via predatory pricing?
  • Why it’s impossible to design a wealth redistribution program that does not cause net harm
  • The truth about "affordable housing" programs
  • Iceland and the financial crisis: a case study of free markets run amok?
  • California energy "deregulation" – proof that free markets don’t work?
  • The real record of Sarbanes-Oxley
  • OSHA and workplace safety
  • The FDA
  • Don’t we need to make an exception for government science funding?
  • A primer on the War on Drugs
  • Obamacare: the problems and the solution
  • Why "stimulus" programs make things worse
  • Are some firms "too big to fail"?
  • Did the "repeal" of Glass-Steagall contribute to the financial crisis?
  • The real story of "deregulation" and the financial crisis
  • The Pentagon’s impact on the U.S. economy
  • Has the Federal Reserve really made the U.S. economy more stable, as so many proponents try to claim?
  • What caused the bank panics of the nineteenth century? Are they evidence of the need for a central bank?
  • The separation of money and state
  • Do we need the Fed to protect us from deflation?
  • Regulation as an anti-competitive device
  • The book goes a long way to dispelling a lot of myths and conventional wisdom about the role of government, government and quasi-government agencies and easing a lot of distrust and fear about the free market.

    So, help keep your local Borders or Barnes & Noble in business by grabbing a copy or snatch one from

    Wednesday, February 16, 2011

    Some Wisdom On The Patriot Act

    Excerpted from Rand Paul's Feb 15, 2011 letter to his Senate colleagues:

    In the words of former Senator Russ Feingold, the only "no" vote against the original version of the PATRIOT Act, "[T]here is no doubt that if we lived in a police state, it would be easier to catch terrorists. If we lived in a country that allowed the police to search your home at any time for any reason; if we lived in a country that allowed the government to open your mail, eavesdrop on your phone conversations, or intercept your email communications; if we lived in a country that allowed the government to hold people in jail indefinitely based on what they write or think, or based on mere suspicion that they are up to no good, then the government would no doubt discover and arrest more terrorists. But that probably would not be a country in which we would want to live. And that would not be a country for which we could, in good conscience, ask our young people to fight and die. In short, that would not be America."